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energy savings
April 7, 2022

U.S. Department of Energy releases energy-saving requirements for federal buildings and new standards for consumer appliances

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced the release of new energy efficiency requirements for federal buildings that will take effect in 2023. Along with these requirements, the DOE also proposed new standards for residential room air conditioners and pool heaters to help consumers save on utility bills. The new codes and standards are estimated to potentially save more than $15 billion in net costs over the next 30 years and allows the federal government to lead by example in energy efficiency.

In April of 2023, all new federal buildings, and major retrofits to existing federal buildings, must comply with the International Code Council’s 2021 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and the 2019 ASHRAE Standard 90.1. According to the DOE, implementation of the IECC and ASHRAE Standard 90.1 will save $4.2 million dollars in operating costs within the first year.

The adoption and implementation of up-to-date model energy codes are key toward achieving energy savings and reducing carbon emissions; the IECC has seen a 40 percent improvement in energy savings starting from the 2006 edition. The Code Council has developed the IECC for over three decades and is committed to providing code officials, policymakers, and the building community with the tools and resources necessary to meet their energy objectives. A recent study done by the DOE found that the implementation of the latest IECC could result in $3.24 billion in annual energy cost savings for consumers.

“As the determination to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gases rises in communities around the world, the Code Council is committed to furthering the advancements of the IECC to aid in the process,” said Code Council Chief Executive Officer Dominic Sims, CBO. “We look forward to continued work with the DOE and will ensure our codes and standards meet the needs of those wishing to advance their energy efficiency goals in a responsible way.”

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The International Code Council is the leading global source of model codes and standards and building safety solutions. Code Council codes, standards and solutions are used to ensure safe, affordable and sustainable communities and buildings worldwide.


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